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seal response

April 2015 Update

In this issue: Can diseases really impede Salish Sea recovery? Multiple impacts of energy transportation projects. SeaDoc recognized in new children's book on ocean … [Read More...]

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Video

SeaDoc science: looking for coastal cutthroat trout

In 2014, SeaDoc started a project to evaluate the health of coastal cutthroat trout populations in streams in the San Juan Islands. Slide show features photographs by Chris Linder.

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SeaDoc killer whale stranding research referenced for Northern California stranding

In April 2015 a dead male orca stranded near Fort Bragg, California. In an article about the stranding, the Lost Coast Outpost referred to the rarity of finding dead orcas. "A 2013 study analyzing North Pacific killer-whale strandings back to 1925 noted that, "while orcas are some of the most widely distributed whales on Earth, very few dead ones are ever found." That 2013 study is our Spatial and temporal analysis of killer whale (Orcinus orca) strandings in the North Pacific Ocean and the … [Read More...]

tank cars by j gaydos

SeaDoc helps Coast Salish Tribes and First Nations study multiple impacts of energy projects

People talk about a new coal terminal. Others about a new pipeline. Some worry about increased shipment of crude oil by rail. But what’s the cumulative impact of all the energy projects being proposed for the Salish Sea? That’s the question that was addressed at a recent meeting of the Coast Salish Gathering, where SeaDoc scientist Joe Gaydos and Swinomish Tribal biologist Jamie Donatuto discussed a study they undertook last year. Between coal terminals, oil pipeline terminals, liquefied … [Read More...]

closeup of killer whale teeth

March 2015 Update

In this issue: SeaDoc helps complete the necropsy of J32 and finds parasites in her ears, National Geographic features SeaDoc's work on birds and forage fish, board member Dr. Deborah Brosnan honored, SeaDoc-funded scientist Dr. Rob Williams gets Pew fellowship, staff news, oil spill workshop, and many upcoming events. … [Read More...]

closeup of killer whale teeth

SeaDoc helps complete necropsy of J32, Rhapsody

Since publishing the first comprehensive paper on diseases of killer whales in 2004, SeaDoc has worked with collaborators to learn more about diseases of killer whales and how they might impact recovery of the endangered southern resident population. Last week, that tradition continued. SeaDoc's Joe Gaydos, working with scientists from NOAA, UC Santa Cruz and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, completed the necropsy of beloved southern resident J32, known to killer whale enthusiasts … [Read More...]

rob williams

Rob Williams named as 2015 PEW Marine Fellow

Canadian scientist Dr. Rob Williams, a past SeaDoc-funded scientist, has been named as a 2015 Pew Marine Fellow. Williams is a marine conservation scientist with the Oceans Initiative and Oceans Research & Conservation Association. The prestigious award will support Williams' effort to identify solutions to reduce ocean noise in important marine habitats. Evidence shows that ocean noise caused by people is doubling every decade, and the effects of this increased noise on sea creatures are … [Read More...]

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Basking shark copyright Florian Graner. Used with permission.

Tracking Transboundary Trouble

How do you know if your ecosystem is in trouble? One clue is the number of species that are in decline or endangered. If that number gets bigger over time, you’re probably heading in the wrong direction. Publications We publish our Species of Concern … [Read More...]

Live Stranded Killer Whale in Hawaii, Photo courtesy of Jessica Aschettino, NOAA/NMFS/PIRO Permit #932-1489-09

Killer Whale Necropsy Protocol (2014)

Killer whale strandings are rare events and biologists and veterinarians should use every stranding as an opportunity to learn more about this species. This necropsy and disease testing protocol, first published in 2005 and updated in 2014, will provide guidelines … [Read More...]

Sunflower Sea star (1)

Sea Star Wasting Disease

Update November 17 2014 SeaDoc was among dozens of collaborators that recently published a paper linking a virus to sea star wasting disease. The paper showed that a virus was involved in the massive outbreak that, since June 2013, has killed millions of sea … [Read More...]

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